A Partridge and a Pear Treat

I must confess, I was slightly confused when I was asked if I would be interested in reviewing a game night at a Chipping Norton pub.

It took a full 10 seconds for the penny to drop that it would be an evening involving eating meat from wild animals, rather than Cluedo, Monopoly and Scrabble. Once I realised, I had no hesitation in accepting.

Game, much like offal, is one of those things that separate the true foodie from those that just eat to stay alive. Many turn their noses up at the thought of eating something that was living in the wild, even branding it cruel to make a meal of a creature that was shot (while, ironically, tucking into factory farmed produce). Many worry about biting into pieces of shot. Others just don’t like the gamey taste. But isn’t flavour what makes food so great?

So it’s three cheers then for the Blue Boar in Chipping Norton for starting a regular Game and Wine Night, to celebrate the delicious food that so many shy away from. And all washed down with matching wines.

It’s a booking only affair, with a limited three-course menu, but it is all the better for that. Assistant manager and all-round cheeky chappie Christian Grant creates a welcoming and friendly atmosphere for the diners, making it more like a dinner party than a meal out, especially in the Blue Boar’s spectacular dining area created in the former stables.

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Well, it did differ from a dinner party in at least one way – it started with a demonstration of how to skin, bone and prepare items of game, including grouse, a pheasant and even a decapitated roe deer. Definitely not one for the squeamish, but if it’s your thing, it was a fascinating and entertaining glimpse into butchery.

We returned to our tables to find a little treat waiting for us – wild boar Scotch eggs and wild boar sausage rolls from the pub’s bar menu. As someone who has munched his way through tonnes of these sort of snacks in his time, I can honestly say they were the best I’ve ever tasted. The sausage meat was sensational, the pastry was perfect and the egg yolk was still runny.

The starters kept up the high standard. My local wood pigeon breast with butternut squash and sage risotto was a marriage made in heaven, with the rich bird – almost livery in flavour – complemented by the sweet, autumnal flavour of the squash.

My wife loved her crispy duck leg croquette with poached pear, but the star of the dish for her was the celeriac remoulade – coleslaw-like shreds of the raw root vegetable in a sweet, tangy mayonnaise dressing – she wouldn’t leave the restaurant without extracting the recipe from chef Dale Ventham.

So now we entered the business end of things with the mains. For me, whole roast partridge with bubble and squeak, roasted parsnip and redcurrant jus. The bird was nice and moist, thanks to it being vacuum-packed and cooked in a water bath before being brown off before serving. The bubble and squeak was crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, and loaded with potato, carrot and cabbage, while the parsnip was a lovely sweet accompaniment. I would have liked a bit more redcurrant in my gravy, but nevertheless it was a lovely dish.

My wife’s venison, wild mushroom and celeriac pithivier was a hearty pie, served with roasted heritage carrots, shallots and a port jus. The aniseed flavour from roasting the veg with fennel seeds got mixed reviews, and the jus could have done with an extra glug of port, but the pastry was crisp, and the filling was rich and moist.

We might not be counting down the 12 days of Christmas yet, but it seemed fitting to follow partridge with a pear. It was poached in port and served with a crunchy walnut crumble and was beautifully light and not over-sweet. A seam of thick, almost cheesy clotted cream filled the inside of the pear, providing the ideal contrast in flavours. Sublime.

My wife’s cheese board was equally impressive, including Oxford Blue and Alex James’s little Wallop. Rock and roll.

All the courses were matched with a specially chosen wine, plus a glass of fizz to start and port to finish. Which makes the price of £35 per person exceptionally good value.

So, I would judge this first event a success. Bring on the next one: game on.

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When life gives you lemons…freeze them!

Ever had the odd occasion when you want a cheeky gin but ice and a slice means cutting up a lemon which will then go to waste?

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One option is to have G&Ts until the whole lemon is vanquished. Alternatively, you could try this clever tip…

Chop your lemon, pop the slices in a container and put it into your freezer – next to the bottle of Hendricks, which obviously tastes better under zero degrees! Next time you want a gin and slim, take a slice from the freezer for instant ice and a slice. And if you sip slowly enough (not possible after witching hour on a Friday) the lemon in your glass will defrost as you drink! Cheers!

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The Pint Shop

img_2880Walking into The Pint Shop in Oxford’s restaurant-packed George Street is a little like walking into a 1960s pub – although it’s actually inspired by the beer houses of the 1830s. The venue looks sparse, with the type of benches and bar stools I can only remember from the dingy dives frequented in my university days. But don’t be fooled. This new bar-cum-restaurant is so on-trend, providing a wealth of ales, lagers and stouts for the would-be craft beer connoisseur, as well as a menu of 102 gins. While Marc supped on pints (including a deeply chocolatey stout called Holy Cow Bell), I tried my hardest, dear reader, to sample as many of the gins as I could. I simply ran out of time.

Below the bar is a simple and spacious restaurant which immediately makes you feel relaxed. The staff are friendly and know exactly what they’re talking about (whether your question is booze or food related). The food is cooked on coals – giving the meat a rich charcoal edge.

Browsing from the menu got my taste buds exercising, and choosing was a trial that no-one should have to endure on a date night! Just so many of the dishes looked enticing to someone normally used to a sloppy TV dinner in front of The Apprentice.

Marc had the unusual shrimp pasty with pickled red onion to start, while I had the southern fried chicken with saffron aioli. Both were delicious, although we agreed that while the pasty pastry was delicious, it did slightly overpower the prawns inside.

For main, I plumped for venison haunch, with squash hash and crispy sage, while his nibs had an all-time favourite: pork belly (cooked deliciously overnight) with braised hispy cabbage in an apple and mustard sauce.

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Both plates were soon depleted, along with the side orders of honey roasted carrot, celeriac and parsnips, red cabbage slaw with cider mayonnaise, and triple-cooked spuds – which were divine, despite the fact that I had failed to notice that they came in a truffle cheese sauce (yes, I am a Philistine who does not enjoy truffles!) Be warned, would-be-Pint-Shopper, the sides are big enough for two or more people, so you really don’t need too many.

At this point Marc and I were both sated, and had little room for anything else, so we sacrificed the coffees and begrudgingly had puddings instead *winks humourously*. Not wanting to mix my drinks, I decided on the gin float.img_2887

This was the most beautifully delicious damson sorbet bobbing in Broker’s gin and framed by a yummy ginger snap.

Marc was slightly disappointed at the size of his tiny espresso and chocolate pot, until he realised it was such a dark, rich delight that it was more than enough to savour with the accompanying shortbread.

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All in all, an evening well spent. Great food and drink, and welcoming staff wrapped in a friendly and relaxing hostelry.

Date night score: 10/10img_2889

For more information, go to pintshop.co.uk/